Teens’ attitudes towards online privacy and online safety

There is the stereotype that “kids these days” share too much on social media, about themselves and about their actions, without much care or concern.   And, then, there is also that other stereotype that “kids these days” are so obsessed with image that they carefully curate the images that they share, thoughtfully choose the … Continue reading Teens’ attitudes towards online privacy and online safety

July 2020 round-up

Last month, I wrote that “all going well, we will be moving at the end of July (please keep your fingers crossed for me – I really need things to not go pear shaped, this time)”. One month later, I am happy, delighted, ecstatic to let you know that we did move! Hooray. I am … Continue reading July 2020 round-up

John Oliver on Face Recognition

A colleague of mine at Brunel, shared this video, about Facial Recognition. It captures some of the ethical challenges presented by this technology – it is well worth a watch. Key points covered in this video include: Start - How it’s depicted in media. 1min - Not just humans. 1:57 - Privacy and civil liberty … Continue reading John Oliver on Face Recognition

Someone else’s reflections on my use of technology

Earlier this year, I wrote a blog post sharing some thoughts I had had (largely, of disappointment) related to my own use of technology. In that post, I noted how the iWatch had become more and more a part of my daily life; how I had mistrusted a human being for trying to bypass the … Continue reading Someone else’s reflections on my use of technology

Perceived blame, matters

In customer service, things are bound to go wrong, at some point. When that happens, it is important to not only understand what went wrong, but also what is the perceived cause of the problem, because that impacts on the recovery strategy.   Take interacting with a chatbot, for instance. As discussed in a previous … Continue reading Perceived blame, matters

The role of online shopping as a mechanism to navigate racial discrimination

Online platforms are useful, additional channels to acquire products and services. For instance, online supermarkets have been lifelines for people isolating at home because of COVID-19. Online platforms are also great channels to talk with firms and other customers, be it as a form of acquiring information, solving problems or, simply, getting emotional support. What … Continue reading The role of online shopping as a mechanism to navigate racial discrimination

Sources of customer dissatisfaction in AI-powered service interactions

Chatbots are everywhere, and used in every industry. They promise to improve customer service, by offering 24-hour service and quick answers, at a fraction of the cost of their human counterparts. Reality is, however, less… polished.   Even a bit frustrating. In the paper “The dark side of AI-powered service interactions: exploring the process of … Continue reading Sources of customer dissatisfaction in AI-powered service interactions

June 2020 round-up

I hope you continue to do OK during these strange times. I am healthy and content, though I am struggling with the passage of time. On the one hand, I can’t believe that just over 4 months ago I was doing X or believing in Y completely different from today – it feels like many … Continue reading June 2020 round-up

Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

“Self-disclosure” refers to the intentional disclosure of personal information, such as location, behaviour or feelings, to third-parties. We all do it, to an extent, because sharing little bits of personal information is a way of cementing social relationships, and increasing likability. For instance, throughout lockdown, my colleagues and I have been talking about hobbies, family, … Continue reading Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

Do price discounts help in crisis recovery?

When clients disappear, and demand dries up, it is tempting to cut prices. Businesses try to lure customers back with a good deal, particularly those that sell perishable items (for instance, food and flowers), seasonable items (for instance, Father’s Day cards and gifts) and services (for instance, restaurants and hairdressers). Hotel managers, for instance, see … Continue reading Do price discounts help in crisis recovery?