Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

The Journal of Public Policy & Marketing published a special collection of papers regarding COVID-19. This included a paper by Aaron R. Brough and Kelly D. Martin, discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic led to four phenomena related to personal data. The four phenomena are: Increased surveillance by governments worldwide, in the form of generalised data … Continue reading Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

I’d rather not be anti-racist. But I have to. And you do, too.

[Note: this is why I am capitalising the words “Black” and “White” in this blog post]   There is a very big difference between not being racist, and actually being anti-racist.   Not being racist comes naturally to most people. Usually, you don’t really have to do much. You just need to not judge someone’s … Continue reading I’d rather not be anti-racist. But I have to. And you do, too.

May 2020 round-up

Earlier this month, during one of my runs, I spotted a beautiful mirror, in a skip, outside the flower shop. I took a photo for my “Today’s run” series. But, then, I remembered Denise Agosto’s beautiful post about an abandoned coin on the pavement. In the post, she reflects on how the fear of the … Continue reading May 2020 round-up

Podcast recommendations: Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper; Why tracing COVID-19 with an app is tricky; and Why automated recommendations technology is struggling

Today, I would like to share with you three podcast episodes. While discussing issues related to COVID-19, they actually offer great insight about consumer psychology, and about the limitations of technology.   Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper In episode 34 the “It's all just a bunch of BS” podcast, Caroline Roux discusses decision making in … Continue reading Podcast recommendations: Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper; Why tracing COVID-19 with an app is tricky; and Why automated recommendations technology is struggling

Can the health locus of control help us understand who will download and use contact tracing apps?

I secured a small grant to investigate UK residents’ perceptions of contact tracing apps. I am just waiting for ethical approval, before I can start collecting data via interviews and, after that, a survey. In the meantime, I am checking the latest published research on related topics.   Based on my previous work, I know … Continue reading Can the health locus of control help us understand who will download and use contact tracing apps?

Adapting to the new normal – Webinar

Yesterday, I joined a webinar to share my colleague Liyuan Wei and I are supporting a boutique hotel to adapt to the challenges presented by COVID-19.   The owner of the hotel very kindly joined us, too, to share his perspective – why he reached out to us, what he is getting from this collaboration, … Continue reading Adapting to the new normal – Webinar

Challenges of working and studying from home – lessons from China

I am due to teach an MBA module in June and a PhD workshop in August, both online. Then, from September, I have undergraduate teaching, which is supposed to be delivered face-to-face, with an online layer for those that can’t be on campus, and ready to continue 100% online in the case of another lockdown … Continue reading Challenges of working and studying from home – lessons from China

Early results suggest that UK residents would trust and use NHS contact tracing app

At the time of writing, the UK Government is testing a contact tracing app. Contact tracing apps are seen as key in enabling an easing of lockdown measures, but are effective only if a majority of citizens use it. And that, in turn, could vary with the app’s features.   A team of researchers at … Continue reading Early results suggest that UK residents would trust and use NHS contact tracing app

COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and why marketing needs to join the discussion

The UK government’s strategy to contain the spread of the SARS-Cov-2 virus has, until now, relied on extreme social distancing, via stay-at-home orders (aka lockdown). Such measures aim to slow down the rate of infection (i.e., flatten the curve) to avoid overwhelming the health services, and to allow for treatments and a vaccine to become … Continue reading COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and why marketing needs to join the discussion

Video from my Brunel Public Webinar Series: Mortgage market lockdown

Earlier this week, I participated in the public webinar series organised by the research office, at Brunel University London.   I discussed why we are experiencing a contraction in the mortgage market, now. Then, drawing on my research about customer screening in financial services, I reflected on how this contraction is likely to create vulnerability … Continue reading Video from my Brunel Public Webinar Series: Mortgage market lockdown