An emoji lost in translation

Earlier this week, I punctuated a message for a colleague with the emoji below: I wanted to express my frustration at a certain situation, by adding an emoji that, in my view, had a certain physical resemblance to me. However, something happened between me (the information source) and my colleague (the destination) such that when … Continue reading An emoji lost in translation

The consumers’ role in the current UK supply problems

The UK is currently experiencing various supply chain problems, resulting in fuel shortages, bare supermarket shelves, reduced options in restaurants, and warnings of disruption for Christmas retail, amid many other problems.  The Institute for Government, a think tank focused on improving efficiency in government and public service, produced a really helpful explainer of the reasons behind the current supply chain … Continue reading The consumers’ role in the current UK supply problems

Qualitative data analysis in marketing

Earlier this week, I participated in a workshop on qualitative data analysis, organised by the Marketing and Corporate Brand Research Group, of Brunel Business School. I started by covering the focus, purpose and scope of qualitative analysis. This was followed by a deep diving into coding, by my colleague Dr Bidit Dey. And, last but … Continue reading Qualitative data analysis in marketing

To be, or not to be humanlike, that is the question for marketing AI

As a concept, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is usually defined in terms of how closely its workings (e.g., ability to hold a conversation) resemble human reasoning. The closer it is to humanlike performance, the better the AI is deemed to be (read about the Turing test, here). But what about the way the AI looks? Or … Continue reading To be, or not to be humanlike, that is the question for marketing AI

Exploring digital technology interactions between residents and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea council, during Covid-19

Yesterday, I went to London with my colleagues Danae Manika and Donna-Marie Holder, to deliver a presentation to the Adult Social Care and Health Select Committee of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (RBKC), on the emerging findings from a research project that we all have been working on, alongside two other colleagues: Emma … Continue reading Exploring digital technology interactions between residents and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea council, during Covid-19

Screen multitasking, cognitive overload, and learning

This week, for me, is week 1 of a new academic year (not all universities start at the same time; and, indeed, even within the same university, there may be staggering starts for different programmes and year groups. Luckily, this year I managed to go back to the classroom. I say “luckily” because, while teaching … Continue reading Screen multitasking, cognitive overload, and learning

What I have been reading #5

13th book of 2021 - “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales” by Oliver Sacks I added this book to my “to read” list back in 2015, when I read Oliver Sacks’s obituary in The Guardian, and became really intrigued about Sacks and his work. Sacks was a neurologist, … Continue reading What I have been reading #5

On academics and practitioners working together

Last Friday, I published a blog post with some thoughts on the potential and limitations of using technology to support assisted living, in the home. This is a matter that is very much in mind, lately, due to some events with ageing relatives. It is also very much on Tim’s mind – who is a … Continue reading On academics and practitioners working together