To be, or not to be humanlike, that is the question for marketing AI

As a concept, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is usually defined in terms of how closely its workings (e.g., ability to hold a conversation) resemble human reasoning. The closer it is to humanlike performance, the better the AI is deemed to be (read about the Turing test, here). But what about the way the AI looks? Or … Continue reading To be, or not to be humanlike, that is the question for marketing AI

The potential and limitations of AI in home care – the users’ view

This week, the English parliament approved a new “health and social care” tax, corresponding to an increase in National Insurance contributions from 12% to 13.25% of salary (i.e., a whopping 10.4% increase!!). This increase is to pay for the home care needs of older people, disabled citizens, and others with high care needs. That is, for carers … Continue reading The potential and limitations of AI in home care – the users’ view

Drivers of acceptance of AI vary with type of service setting

Not all consumption settings are the same. They can range from situations where we can easily evaluate what we are consuming (for instance, buying a new car), to situations where we can only evaluate what we are consuming afterwards (for instance, renting a car), as well as situations where we will struggle to evaluate what … Continue reading Drivers of acceptance of AI vary with type of service setting

Critical science’s framework to classify the risks from AI

Artificial Intelligence has great potential, but also presents many risks, from taking over jobs, to making biased decisions. Rather than thinking about the risks of AI separately and reactively, it would be useful to have a framework to identify those risks holistically and proactively.  Shakir Mohamed, Marie-Therese Png and William Isaac suggest one such framework, … Continue reading Critical science’s framework to classify the risks from AI

What I have been reading #2

This is a follow up to my previous post on what I have been reading this year (and reviewing, on Instagram). 3rd book of 2021 – “The Spirit Level” by Seamus Heaney. Heaney won the Nobel prize for Literature in 1995, and this was the first book of poems published after winning that accolade. I found … Continue reading What I have been reading #2

New paper: Gigification, job engagement and satisfaction: the moderating role of AI enabled system automation in operations management

Weifeng Chen, Ashley Braganza, Serap Sap and I have investigating how Artificial Intelligence (AI) impacts on work (as opposed to jobs) and workers. Previously, we had found that AI-enabled work automation caused significant uncertainties for workers, and a change in the relationship between workers and their employers, towards independence between the two parties. Building on that work, … Continue reading New paper: Gigification, job engagement and satisfaction: the moderating role of AI enabled system automation in operations management

Artificial Intelligence Committee report – Roadmap for the UK

The Artificial Intelligence (AI) Committee has just published its report, providing a roadmap for the UK government, when developing the country’s national AI strategy. The Committee delivered 16 recommendations, across four areas of intervention. They are: Image source The full report – which is very readable – is available here. I particularly like priorities 5, 6, … Continue reading Artificial Intelligence Committee report – Roadmap for the UK

New paper: Leveraging machine learning in the global fight against money laundering and terrorism financing: An affordances perspective

There is a lot of enthusiasm about the potential of artificial intelligence in general, and machine learning in particular, to solve just about any problem on Earth. Thus, a special issue of the Journal of Business Research is looking at the potential of those technologies to meet the United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals; and … Continue reading New paper: Leveraging machine learning in the global fight against money laundering and terrorism financing: An affordances perspective

Slides from “Coping with chatbot service failure” talk

Here are the slides from my (online) talk at BML Munjal University, earlier this month. This talk draws on my work on identifying how artificial intelligence can destroy business value, and specifically the empirical work developed my doctoral student Daniela Castillo (paper here; discussion here and here). The talk was followed by a Q&A, where participants … Continue reading Slides from “Coping with chatbot service failure” talk

New paper: “Productive employment and decent work: The impact of AI adoption on psychological contracts, job engagement and employee trust”

Ashley Braganza, Weifeng Chen, Serap Sap and myself just had a paper published in the Journal of Business Research. The title of the paper is “Productive Employment and Decent Work: The Impact of AI Adoption on Psychological Contracts, Job Engagement and Employee Trust”.  The paper examines the effect of the combined emerging work practices of gig work and AI-enabled work automation, … Continue reading New paper: “Productive employment and decent work: The impact of AI adoption on psychological contracts, job engagement and employee trust”