Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

“Self-disclosure” refers to the intentional disclosure of personal information, such as location, behaviour or feelings, to third-parties. We all do it, to an extent, because sharing little bits of personal information is a way of cementing social relationships, and increasing likability. For instance, throughout lockdown, my colleagues and I have been talking about hobbies, family, … Continue reading Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

Do price discounts help in crisis recovery?

When clients disappear, and demand dries up, it is tempting to cut prices. Businesses try to lure customers back with a good deal, particularly those that sell perishable items (for instance, food and flowers), seasonable items (for instance, Father’s Day cards and gifts) and services (for instance, restaurants and hairdressers). Hotel managers, for instance, see … Continue reading Do price discounts help in crisis recovery?

Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

The Journal of Public Policy & Marketing published a special collection of papers regarding COVID-19. This included a paper by Aaron R. Brough and Kelly D. Martin, discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic led to four phenomena related to personal data. The four phenomena are: Increased surveillance by governments worldwide, in the form of generalised data … Continue reading Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

I’d rather not be anti-racist. But I have to. And you do, too.

[Note: this is why I am capitalising the words “Black” and “White” in this blog post]   There is a very big difference between not being racist, and actually being anti-racist.   Not being racist comes naturally to most people. Usually, you don’t really have to do much. You just need to not judge someone’s … Continue reading I’d rather not be anti-racist. But I have to. And you do, too.

May 2020 round-up

Earlier this month, during one of my runs, I spotted a beautiful mirror, in a skip, outside the flower shop. I took a photo for my “Today’s run” series. But, then, I remembered Denise Agosto’s beautiful post about an abandoned coin on the pavement. In the post, she reflects on how the fear of the … Continue reading May 2020 round-up

Podcast recommendations: Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper; Why tracing COVID-19 with an app is tricky; and Why automated recommendations technology is struggling

Today, I would like to share with you three podcast episodes. While discussing issues related to COVID-19, they actually offer great insight about consumer psychology, and about the limitations of technology.   Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper In episode 34 the “It's all just a bunch of BS” podcast, Caroline Roux discusses decision making in … Continue reading Podcast recommendations: Why we stockpile(d) toilet paper; Why tracing COVID-19 with an app is tricky; and Why automated recommendations technology is struggling

Can the health locus of control help us understand who will download and use contact tracing apps?

I secured a small grant to investigate UK residents’ perceptions of contact tracing apps. I am just waiting for ethical approval, before I can start collecting data via interviews and, after that, a survey. In the meantime, I am checking the latest published research on related topics.   Based on my previous work, I know … Continue reading Can the health locus of control help us understand who will download and use contact tracing apps?

Adapting to the new normal – Webinar

Yesterday, I joined a webinar to share my colleague Liyuan Wei and I are supporting a boutique hotel to adapt to the challenges presented by COVID-19.   The owner of the hotel very kindly joined us, too, to share his perspective – why he reached out to us, what he is getting from this collaboration, … Continue reading Adapting to the new normal – Webinar

Challenges of working and studying from home – lessons from China

I am due to teach an MBA module in June and a PhD workshop in August, both online. Then, from September, I have undergraduate teaching, which is supposed to be delivered face-to-face, with an online layer for those that can’t be on campus, and ready to continue 100% online in the case of another lockdown … Continue reading Challenges of working and studying from home – lessons from China

Early results suggest that UK residents would trust and use NHS contact tracing app

At the time of writing, the UK Government is testing a contact tracing app. Contact tracing apps are seen as key in enabling an easing of lockdown measures, but are effective only if a majority of citizens use it. And that, in turn, could vary with the app’s features.   A team of researchers at … Continue reading Early results suggest that UK residents would trust and use NHS contact tracing app