Teens’ attitudes towards online privacy and online safety

There is the stereotype that “kids these days” share too much on social media, about themselves and about their actions, without much care or concern.   And, then, there is also that other stereotype that “kids these days” are so obsessed with image that they carefully curate the images that they share, thoughtfully choose the … Continue reading Teens’ attitudes towards online privacy and online safety

Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

“Self-disclosure” refers to the intentional disclosure of personal information, such as location, behaviour or feelings, to third-parties. We all do it, to an extent, because sharing little bits of personal information is a way of cementing social relationships, and increasing likability. For instance, throughout lockdown, my colleagues and I have been talking about hobbies, family, … Continue reading Analysis of COVID-19 related tweets shows emphasis on self-centric, support seeking content among users that disclose personal information

Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

The Journal of Public Policy & Marketing published a special collection of papers regarding COVID-19. This included a paper by Aaron R. Brough and Kelly D. Martin, discussing how the COVID-19 pandemic led to four phenomena related to personal data. The four phenomena are: Increased surveillance by governments worldwide, in the form of generalised data … Continue reading Impact of COVID-19 on the generation and disclosure of personal data

Biases in algorithms – the case of Hello Barbie

Sometime ago, I saw a presentation by Val Steeves, Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa (Canada), about her research on smart toys. The talk focused on Hello Barbie, a Barbie-branded doll which is advertised as “the first fashion doll that can have a two-way conversation with girls”, and featuring “speech recognition and progressive … Continue reading Biases in algorithms – the case of Hello Barbie

Data harvesting on social media as seduction

In an ideal world, customers would flock to our doors, buy our products over and over again, and happily tell others about their experiences with our brands. But, in the real world, that doesn’t usually happen. In the real world, marketers need to use various techniques to convince customers to use their product. For instance, … Continue reading Data harvesting on social media as seduction

Apple Watch Series 4 will appeal to older customers; and that is a great marketing move

At its latest event, on 12thSeptember 2018, Apple announced a new version of its smartwatch. The Apple Watch Series 4 includes features such as a display that has 30% more usable space than the previous versions, a fall detection mechanism which sends out an alert if the user remains immobile after the suspected fall, and … Continue reading Apple Watch Series 4 will appeal to older customers; and that is a great marketing move

A peak into tech giants’ terms and conditions

I don’t think that I have ever read a full set of terms and conditions from one of the tech giants. And I think that I am in the majority, here.   Most terms of service are extremely long, as illustrated by Dima Yarovinsky’s installation at the Visualizing Knowledge 2018 exhibition. The artist printed the … Continue reading A peak into tech giants’ terms and conditions

GPDR is great but not enough. A change in attitudes is urgently needed.

Did you survive #GDPRday, and the associated barrage of e-mails letting you know about updated privacy policies, or asking you to opt-in to mailing lists?   Let’s hope this new regulation will be a catalyst for change in organisations’ attitudes towards personal data. However, we can neither lay all the blame on organisations, nor all … Continue reading GPDR is great but not enough. A change in attitudes is urgently needed.

When consumers feel powerless about a situation, their attitude changes

I came across Dr Kristin Laurin’s work on rationalisation when she participated in episode 125 of the You Are Not So Smart podcast.   She found that people’s core beliefs change when they feel powerless about the situation that they find themselves in. This occurs via a process of rationalisation – i.e., we try to … Continue reading When consumers feel powerless about a situation, their attitude changes