Three things you need to know, if you are using Twitter to study consumer emotions

With 313m monthly active users around the world, of which 82% access Twitter via their mobile handsets, Twitter is likely to be a great source of insight into what customers are doing, paying attention to, or talking about. As Pratik Thakar, Coca-Cola’s head of creative content for Asia-Pacific, said, it is like a big focus … Continue reading Three things you need to know, if you are using Twitter to study consumer emotions

Something for your weekend #6: bug business (podcast)

If you have 30 minutes free this weekend, listen to the 'Bug Business' episode of the Start-Up podcast (season 5, episode 6). If has some valuable marketing lessons about introducing a new product / idea. In this case, the new idea is is trying to convince people to eat insects, but the lessons are valuable … Continue reading Something for your weekend #6: bug business (podcast)

The teen with no phone number

Last weekend, the teen had a friend over who has a smartphone. Well, what teen does not have one, these days, right? The reason I am mentioning this is that said friend’s smartphone did not have a sim. Initially, I thought that they meant that the sim was malfunctioning. But, no. What they meant was … Continue reading The teen with no phone number

The murky link between customer satisfaction and loyalty

Intuitively, it is easy to accept the claim that customer satisfaction leads to repeat purchases. After all, if you have a choice, why would you abandon a brand that has surpassed your expectations1; and why would you keep buying from a brand that has disappointed you?   Happy customers buy again. Unhappy customers, move on. … Continue reading The murky link between customer satisfaction and loyalty

Smartphone manufacturing costs vs retail prices

Statistics company, Statista, published this chart showing the manufacturing costs of leading smartphone brands:   Focusing on phones launched in 2016, only, we can see that Huawei uses the cheapest components, and Google Pixel the most expensive. And that Samsung phones use more expensive hardware components than their Apple counterpart: Phone model Manufacturing cost $ … Continue reading Smartphone manufacturing costs vs retail prices

Smartphone use: e-mail and social up; phone calls down

Deloitte’s 2016 Global Mobile Consumer survey reveals that the proportion of UK smartphone users who use their phone for web-enabled activities continues to increase. For instance, 56% of users now use instant messaging at least once a week. The number is 59% for social networks, and 71% for e-mail. At the same time, the proportion … Continue reading Smartphone use: e-mail and social up; phone calls down

Useful primer on (consumer) behaviour models

Today I want to share with you a fabulous report that I found, summarising more than 60 theories and models of behaviour. It is a great primer on the topic, authored by Andrew Danton, which very neatly summarises the assumptions, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches.   This report is part … Continue reading Useful primer on (consumer) behaviour models

Should gyms be fun or hardwork?

I am quite annoyed with myself.   You see, I usually pride myself of seeing through tempting packaging or sales deals, and base my purchase decisions on the product and its value for me, more than anything else.     Yet, here I am, very foolishly mourning the fact that the gym that I usually … Continue reading Should gyms be fun or hardwork?

Oh, don’t you love the smell of 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline?

Today, a marketing lesson from the kiddo:   What he is talking about, here, is the role of smell as a stimulus. Smell (and other stimuli like colour, temperature, or sounds) can create an affective response in shoppers. This can either be a direct emotional reaction to the stimulus (e.g., the smell makes us feel hungry); or … Continue reading Oh, don’t you love the smell of 2-Acetyl-1-pyrroline?

Why do women pay extra for products?

In the UK, as in the US, women routinely pay more for the same, or identical, products marketed at men. The difference, which is sometimes referred to as the pink tax, can range from a few percentage points, to twice as much. Sometimes, the only difference is that the product is pink; other times, not … Continue reading Why do women pay extra for products?