Covid-19 lockdowns, 2 years on: positive impact on subjective wellbeing, and lingering effect on time spent at home. But fitness industry is bouncing back.

Last Friday (March 11th) marked two years since the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared Covid-19 a pandemic. In the meantime, we have experienced some truly depressing moments such as when the number of global casualties reach 1 million; as well as some truly exhilarating ones, such as when it was confirmed that scientists had developed … Continue reading Covid-19 lockdowns, 2 years on: positive impact on subjective wellbeing, and lingering effect on time spent at home. But fitness industry is bouncing back.

New paper: The Pandemic-Induced Personal Data Explosion

Back in June 2020, I came across a special collection of papers about COVID-19, in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. Within that collection, the paper “Consumer Privacy During (and After) the COVID-19 Pandemic”, by Aaron R. Brough and Kelly D. Martin caught my attention. That paper reflected on the implications of the increased … Continue reading New paper: The Pandemic-Induced Personal Data Explosion

More than a party – A consumer behaviour look at the impact of government sleaze on public health

Trust in politicians in the UK has taken a tumble, recently. The IPPR revealed that, as of the end of last year, the British Public’s distrust in politicians was at an all-time high: Image source Moreover, according to YouGov numbers, as of last week, almost 2/3 of all UK adults disapproved of the Government’s record … Continue reading More than a party – A consumer behaviour look at the impact of government sleaze on public health

Guest talk: Brian Bartolo, Director of Sales and Marketing

Service providers usually have fixed capacity. For instance, there are only so many people that can safely travel on a given flight; so many haircuts that can be done in a day; or so many meals that can be served at a time.  On the other hand, interest in that service (i.e., the demand) tends … Continue reading Guest talk: Brian Bartolo, Director of Sales and Marketing

New research project: Traveling in England, post Covid-19

I am working with my colleague Dr. Liyuan Wei, a boutique hotel on Oxford, and the regional tourism board to investigate the potential for a mobile app or website to help tourists feel safe when visiting the area. To this end, we are now interviewing people who have travelled in England, during 2021, and who … Continue reading New research project: Traveling in England, post Covid-19

New paper: Stakeholders of the World, Unite!: Hospitality in the time of COVID-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc with many industries, but few have suffered more than the hospitality industry. Not only has leisure travel all but disappeared, but businesses, too, have cancelled all meetings, conferences and other bookings. And, with the lack of clarity about operating conditions, and about evolving customer preferences, hotels are facing an … Continue reading New paper: Stakeholders of the World, Unite!: Hospitality in the time of COVID-19

[Miscellany] Christmas is here, again

Just like that (or what feels like “just like that” to me – maybe for those working in health services it feels never ending), it is December, and Christmas is around the corner. Four days’ away, to be precise. And, after that, the New Year. If you live in the Western Hemisphere, and if you … Continue reading [Miscellany] Christmas is here, again

Understanding resistance to contact tracing: data being used for purposes other than those for which they were initially collected, and governments’ use of the data

I came across a paper reporting on a series of surveys of attitudes towards contact tracing, for the purpose of containing the spread of Covid-19, and how it related to concerns over privacy. The paper is entitled “COVID-19 Contact Tracing and Privacy: Studying Opinion and Preferences”, and it was co-authored by Lucy Simko, Ryan Calo, Franziska … Continue reading Understanding resistance to contact tracing: data being used for purposes other than those for which they were initially collected, and governments’ use of the data

September 2020 round-up

September was about the return to routine. We returned to work after the family vacation. The kiddo returned to school after the long summer break, and the teen returned to her student accommodation. We also returned to the gym, after the lockdown.  Of course, everything is different this time around. Meetings are taking place online. Face … Continue reading September 2020 round-up

The A-level algorithm debacle shows us that algorithms + poor data = myths with a veneer of legitimacy

UK students due to sit exams this Spring (for instance, A-level exams, for entrance into University), saw their examinations cancelled, as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic and the need to avoid group gatherings. Instead, as explained in the gov.uk website: “For each student, schools and colleges have provided a ‘centre assessment grade’ for each … Continue reading The A-level algorithm debacle shows us that algorithms + poor data = myths with a veneer of legitimacy