March 2020 round-up

At the beginning of the month, I wrote in my journal that March would be a month in two halves. And it was. But not at all as I had imagined it would be. To be fair, my months rarely pan out as planned. But, boy, has this month been unexpected?!   The first half … Continue reading March 2020 round-up

New paper: Organisational tensions arising from mandatory data exchange between the private and public sector: The case of financial services

While many aspects of life have come to a standstill, due to Covid19, others continue to play out. Some of those things feel very much out of context, when they arrive in my inbox, for instance – just like the sea shell that I found while emptying the pockets of my son’s school uniform jacket. … Continue reading New paper: Organisational tensions arising from mandatory data exchange between the private and public sector: The case of financial services

February 2020 round-up

February was good.   There were some moments of intense sadness, for instance, following the news that Caroline Flack had committed suicide. But, overall, February was a month with a definite sense of momentum at work, with several pieces falling into place. It was also a month with a sense of fun, which even included … Continue reading February 2020 round-up

How did the 2008 financial crisis impact on financial exclusion?

Ten years ago, the UK was in the grips of a major financial and economic crisis, triggered by the ‘credit crunch’ experienced in the previous year (1). Major financial institutions like Northern Rock or Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, others like the Royal Bank of Scotland required government intervention to stay afloat, and most – if … Continue reading How did the 2008 financial crisis impact on financial exclusion?

My PhD, 10 years on

This month (November 5th to be exact) marked the 10th anniversary of my PhD viva. I did my PhD at LSE with Dr James Backhouse, and investigated the profiling of undesirable customers (or customer screening). I looked at how organisations define who is a desirable customer, and who isn’t one; and the process that they … Continue reading My PhD, 10 years on

Benefits and challenges of using social media to profile consumers

  A recent consulting assignment prompted me to revisit the findings from a research project that I conducted three years ago, with Moira Clark and Paul Fennemore. We looked at how business-to-consumer organisations were using social media to complement their segmentation efforts. Here is an overview of our findings.   The first part of our study … Continue reading Benefits and challenges of using social media to profile consumers

July round-up

July was going to be the month I was going to get on top of my to do list. It didn’t happen. It was nonetheless a good month, which included the following highlights.   Researching At the beginning of the month, I attended the Academy of Marketing conference, in Bournemouth. I presented 2 papers, including … Continue reading July round-up

The performative power of the score

There are two interesting articles in the news, today. They are about two very different companies but, essentially, the same issue: the performative power of the score. Or, in others words, about how much a simple number can influence our life.   The first article is about passenger transportation company, Uber. It was revealed that … Continue reading The performative power of the score

Research project completed: Customer data in the digital age

It has been a whirlwind, but we did it: the team has now concluded the research project investigating Customer data in the Digital Age. And one day before the deadline 😉   Together with 5 other colleagues from Oxford Brookes University, Open University and the University of Liverpool, we completed in-depth interviews with 15 senior marketing practitioners. … Continue reading Research project completed: Customer data in the digital age